How to Crochet, Maddy's Minis

How to Crochet: The Primrose Stitch

Primrose

Hi Friends!  Welcome to my tutorial for The Primrose Stitch. This one is another of those two-row stitches, where the stitches on the upper row complete the stitches on the row under it. As such, you’ll want to end your piece on the second row of the two to have an even, complete ending to your primrose pattern.

For this stitch, you’ll need to know (beyond the basics) single crochet, double crochet, and half double crochet.

Below is this week’s Maddy’s Mini of me doing the primrose stitch, so you have an idea of the flow of the thing before we go into the details:

I swear, the getting-a-tripod-for-my-phone-camera thing will happen one fine day. Not this day, obviously.

Anyway, to the instructions!

Because this stitch is three stitches long for a complete ‘primrose’, you’ll want to chain in a multiple of three. I’ve done mine in a 30 chain, for example.

For this first (foundation) row (which will be Row A in subsequent rows), chain two to bring the row up to full height, and in every 3rd stitch (ie, skip two stitches and work the third, then skip another two stitches and work the third, etc), do one single crochet, chain two, and another single crochet. In the last stitch of the chain, do a half-double crochet stitch before turning your work. It should look something like this:

img_2584.jpg

(I think it’s pretty cute. It looks like a little row of little houses)

For the new row (hereafter, Row B), chain 3 and then do three double crochet in the space of each “shell” (ie, into where you did the “chain 2” in the row below or, as I like to think of it, the attics of the little houses you just made) the whole way across. End your row with one double crochet in the last stitch of the row (remember that in this first row after the foundation row, you need the longer curved stitch way at the end of the foundation row, or you’ll be one row short and have a little nubby bit sticking out at the end). It should look like this:

img_2585

Now, for a proper Row A (in blue, to emphasize which part is new and how it fits in). It’s basically the same of the foundation row, but instead of only working in every third stitch, you’ll be working in the middle double-crochet of every cluster. Again, the pattern is chain two at the beginning, in each middle of cluster do a single crochet, two chains, and other single crochet to make a little “house”, and end with a half-double crochet.

img_2589

Row B, same as above (in white, to contrast the bits fit into Row A)

img_2590

And that’s it! if it’s helpful to have in abbreviated form:

Row A: Ch 2, 1 sc + chain 2 + 1 sc in either every third stitch OR the middle stitch of the previous row’s clusters all the way across, end row with 1 hdc in last stitch in previous row

Row B: Ch 3, 3 dc into each shell of previous row all the way across, end with 1 dc in last stitch of previous row

And that’s all!  You’re now the proud maker of the Primrose stitch!

Do you have any questions? Concerns? Did I lose you somewhere in my explanation? Please don’t hesitate to comment here, throw me an email (maddy.crochets@gmail.com), or leave a comment on the facebook group. I’m happy to help anyone who could use a hand 🙂

Don’t forget to support me on Patreon if you can spare a dollar each month (but only if it’s in your budget, please; crochet should be accessible to everyone), or drop me a note to say hi, or any other feedback your heart desires.

I’ll see you back here next Monday to learn the Crunchy Stitch! It’s super cute and makes a great texture for things like dishcloths.

Be happy, healthy, and safe!

Maddy

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